Teachers Are Heroes in Disguise.

I started off my college career in the fall of 1992 as a journalism major.  I had been writing for the local paper during my senior year in high school and had every intention of becoming a newspaper reporter who dabbled in magazines.  Little did anyone know that my other choice was to be a teacher.  It was a coin toss as to what I was going to major in, because really, I loved both, but felt I had to be a journalism major.

When my Early Childhood major roommate started coming back to the dorm with fun projects and activities, I knew I had to switch majors.  There was no way I could continue on for four years without being able to create some of those adorable learning centers that she worked on day and night.  Journalism just couldn’t compete with crayons and construction paper.

So began my life as an Elementary Education major.  I loved it and was certain I would continue to teach forever.

Fast forward to 2012.

The irony of life (and also the greatest blessing) is that I now homeschool my three children and manage the very successful blog and social media presence of a major educational supply company.  To say that it’s the best of both worlds doesn’t even begin to describe how amazing it is.  The fact that they let me write ebooks for them?  It’s the icing on the cake.  I am so grateful.

One of the best parts about my job is that I get to interact with and assist the teachers who frequent the company’s social media sites.  In the last two years, I’ve helped to grow the Facebook following from less than 5K to almost 41K.  For a niche company, that kind of growth is awesome.  I also started and run their #TeachChat Twitter chats every other Wednesday night.  I talk with teachers all the time.  And I adore them.

There’s something amazing about those who have found their calling as educators of our nation’s youth.  They’re dedicated, determined, humorous, passionate, friendly, encouraging, helpful, insightful, giving, generous, open-minded, loving, compassionate, creative, and relentless in their pursuit of finding ways to reach all students.  They are heroes in disguise.

I may not be in the classroom anymore, but I’m still teaching and always will.  And I will never stop admiring those who wake up at 4:30am to be at school an hour early to teach a class of 32 children the ins-and-outs of all they need to know.  To teachers everywhere, thank you for being amazing.  You are appreciated.

4 thoughts on “Teachers Are Heroes in Disguise.

  1. Well, since you are my doppleganger, you already know that I HAD to be a journalist when I was younger. I started off as a journalism major in college and wrote for the local and school papers. I could see the Pulitzer Prize in my future.

    But, then I got bit by the early childhood bug, and here I am today…teaching 3rd graders, and, interestingly enough, writing for a very successful education supply company’s blog. Thanks, boss, for letting me feel my writing oats again!

    But, boy, do I feel guilty. Because I so owe you a column.

  2. My mother was one of those teachers that ran into her happy students everywhere we seemed to go. I grew up to the sounds of, “Hi, Mrs. Wilson!!!” and my mom would smile and chat with a 16 year old behind the counter at McDonald’s or a 20 year old behind the check-out desk at the library. She taught middle school science and then high school health. She retired about three years ago, but I never stop being proud of her when we happen to run into one of her old students and they beam and so obviously transmit how much they loved this woman that I am lucky enough to call Mom. Teachers are heroes, indeed.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s